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High School - English - Freshman - Unit 1
Literary Elements and the Short Story
This unit, the first of six, explores the elements of fiction through short stories. It also takes a close look at how a good author must use the writing process to create interesting works of literature.
OVERVIEW Show All | Hide All | Top

This unit serves as an in-depth study of the short story and literary elements. Throughout the unit, students will identify plot, theme, and complex characters while formulating inferences, recognizing point of view, and analyzing text structures within various short stories. Student will also build skills in collaborative (large and small group) discussion. The writing process will be used to develop a piece of writing using standard English and correct spelling.

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COMMON CORE STANDARDS Show All | Hide All | Top
RL-9-10:1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
RL-9-10:3: Analyze how complex characters ) e.g., those with multiple or conflicting motivations) develop over the course of a text, interact with other characters, and advance the plot or develop the theme.
RL-9-10:5: Analyze how an author’s choices concerning how to structure a text (e.g., parallel plots), order events within it (e.g., pacing), and manipulate time (e.g., flashbacks) create such effects as mystery, tension, or surprise.
SL-9-10:1: Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 9-10 topics, texts, and issues building on others’ ideas and expressing their own clearly and persuasively.
a. Come to discussions prepared, having read and researched material under study; explicitly draw on that preparation by referring to evidence from texts and other research on the topic or issue to stimulate a thoughtful, well-reasoned exchange of ideas.
b. Work with peers to set rules for collegial discussion and decision-making (e.g., informal consensus, taking votes on key issues, presentation of alternate views), clear goals and deadlines, and individual roles as needed.
c. Propel conversations by posing and responding to questions to questions that relate the current discussion to broader themes or larger ideas; actively incorporate others into the discussion; and clarify, verify, or challenge ideas and conclusions.
d. Respond thoughtfully to diverse perspectives, summarize points of agreement and disagreement, and when warranted, qualify or justify their own views and understanding and make new connections in light of the evidence and reasoning presented.
L 9-10:2 : Demonstrate command of the conventions of Standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.
c. Spell correctly
W9-10:5: Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach focusing on addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose and audience. (Editing for conventions should demonstrate command of Language standards 1-3 up to and including grades 9-10 on page 54.)
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STUDENT LEARNING TARGETS Show All | Hide All | Top
  • define inference
  • cite strong textual evidence to support analysis of what a text says explicitly.
  • differentiate between what a text says explicitly and what must be inferred.
  • formulate inferences.
  • cite strong textual evidence to support inferences generated from a text.
  • define plot, theme, and character.
  • identify plot, theme, and character.
  • recognize complex characters.
  • explain how character interaction can advance the plot.
  • analyze how complex characters develop over the course of a text.
  • determine how character interaction advances the plot or develops the theme.
  • list the order of events in a text.
  • explain how an author manipulates time.
  • identify the effect created by an author’s choices.
  • analyze how text structure creates effects such as mystery, tension, or surprise.
  • analyze how the order of events creates effects such as mystery, tension or surprise.
  • analyze how the manipulation of time creates effects such as mystery, tension, or surprise.
  • understand the skills of persuasion.
  • understand conventions of discussion
  • evaluate evidence from texts and other research on a particular topic.
  • support or dispute ideas and conclusions.
  • critique diverse perspectives.
  • organize points of agreement and disagreement.
  • support or defend personal views and understanding.
  • modify contradictions when possible.
  • draw conclusions in light of the evidence and reasoning presented.
  • demonstrate preparation through discussion
  • assemble evidence from texts and other research in a thoughtful, well-reasoned way.
  • model a thoughtful, well-reasoned exchange of ideas.
  • work with peers to set rules for collegial discussions and decision-making.
  • work with peers to set clear goals for collegial discussions and decision-making.
  • work with peers to set deadlines for collegial discussions and decision-making.
  • work with peers to set individual roles for collegial discussions and decision-making.
  • pose questions that relate the current discussion to broader themes or larger ideas.
  • respond to questions that relate the current discussion to broader themes or larger ideas.
  • incorporate others into the discussion.
  • recognize the correct spellings of words.
  • evaluate the correct spelling of similar words.
  • use correct spelling when writing.
  • know the writing process.
  • know when writing needs developing and strengthening.
  • understand the significance of writing for a specific purpose and audience.
  • determine when to use the writing process.
  • determine ways to develop and strengthen writing.
  • determine how to focus on audience and purpose.
  • demonstrate the writing process.
  • use the writing process to develop and strengthen my writing.
  • demonstrate writing for a specific audience and purpose.
  • can develop and strengthen writing by following the writing process (planning, revising, editing, and rewriting).
  • develop and strengthen writing by trying a new approach focusing on addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose and audience.
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CRITICAL VOCABULARY Show All | Hide All | Top
Reading
· Character
o Antagonist/Protagonist
o Dynamic/Static
o Epiphany
o Flat/Round
o Foil
o Motivation
o Stock
· Characterization
· Plot
o Conflict
o Flashback
o Foreshadowing
o Suspense
o Exposition
o Rising Action
o Climax
o Falling Action
o Resolution
· Point of View
o Person
o Perspective (1st, 3rd)
· Setting
· Theme
· Symbolism
Writing
· Writing Process
o Prewrite
o Draft
o Edit
o Rewrite
· Audience
· Purpose
Other Reading Vocab
· Infer
· Cite
· Textual Evidence
· Explicit
· Textual Analysis
· Manipulate
· Evaluate
· Support
· Critique
· Differentiate
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LEARNING EXPERIENCES Show All | Hide All | Top
Educator Uploaded Plans (These are educators specific templates with included information and specifics)
RESOURCES Show All | Hide All | Top
LITERACY STRATEGIES Show All | Hide All | Top
Read alouds
Scaffolding
Dialectical Journal/Reader’s Notebook
Think Tank
Desktop Blogging
Think alouds
Think-Pair-Share
Vocab-O-Gram
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THOUGHTFUL EDUCATION TOOLS Show All | Hide All | Top
Word Wall
Various graphic organizers
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